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Courage of Conscience Award Recipients

 

Frank Robinson Visionary founder of Camp Arrowhead and Camp Warren for children and young adults with special needs with students from the Life Experience School.

The Peace Abbey honors individuals and organizations who are recognized internationally for their humanitarian and peace activism, along with local, grassroots, unsung heroes of social change.  The Peace Abbey supports and encourages the noble work of individuals and groups who are, all too often, too little known, by bestowing on them the Courage of Conscience Award that Mother Teresa, the Dalai Lama, Rosa Parks, Muhammad Ali, John Lennon, Dan Berrigan, Pete Seeger, Desmond Tutu, Maya Angelou, and many other extraordinary individuals have received at Peace Abbey ceremonies.

There is no monetary value that accompanies this award, only the blessing that comes from receiving this prestigious recognition from a place whose mission is linking insufficiently recognized practitioners of nonviolent social action with the extraordinary work of high profile humanitarians.  It is our prayer that this humble gesture of appreciation brings recipients together in ways that inspire further service and creativity leading to world peace, social justice and nonviolence.

Listed in order of receiving the Award.

1. OXFAM AMERICA
International humanitarian and hunger relief organization for its innovative self-help community programs for people in developing nations. Read More

2. ELLWOOD KIESER
Priest and founding Producer of Paulist Productions for creating the films “Romero” – the Life of Archbishop Oscar Romero and “Entertaining Angels” – the Life of Dorothy Day.

3. DICK SCOBIE
Quaker, pacifist, Executive Director of the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee for his work to expose human rights violations in El Salvador and to promote peace throughout Central America.

4  JAMES R. BROCKMAN
Priest and author for his book Romero – The Life of Archbishop Oscar Romero, martyr of El Salvador.

5. JOACHIM LALLY
Paulist Priest and community activist for his work within the Massachusetts Latino community.

6. PETER, PAUL & MARY
Musical trio and political activists for their commitment to peace in Central America and for supporting musically and personally the peace and social justice movement in America. Read More

7. PEACE BRIGADES INTERNATIONAL
Gandhian human rights organization for providing unarmed accompaniment to activists on death squad lists throughout the Third World. Read More

8. VOICE of the VOICELESS OF EL SALVADOR
Humanitarian group for its efforts to protect and empower the impoverished in El Salvador.

9. ERNESTO CARDENAL
Jesuit priest, poet, philosopher and former Secretary of the Interior and Education in the Sandanista Government in Nicaragua for bringing the gospel into politics.

10. MOTHER TERESA of CALCUTTA (AGNES GONXHA BOYAXHIU)
Catholic nun, humanitarian and spiritual teacher for her work with the Missionaries of Charity serving the poorest of the poor in India and throughout the world. Read More

11. FINDING
Human rights organization for its efforts to assist families in locating those disappeared in Guatemala.

12. JOSE “CHENCHO” ALAS
Priest, social revolutionary and aide to Monsignor Oscar Romero for bringing the social gospel to base communities in El Salvador and Nicaragua.

13. RAUL JULIA
Actor and humanitarian for his portrayal of Archbishop Romero in the film “Romero” and Chico Mendez in the film “Burning Seasons”.

14. THE XIV DALAI LAMA of TIBET (TENZIN GYATSO)
Buddhist monk, humanitarian, spiritual teacher and exiled leader of Tibet for his example of compassion and forgiveness following the massacre of his people and culture by the occupying army of China. Read More

15. HOWARD W. MOORE
Secular humanist and pacifist for his tenacious and impassioned leadership as a conscientious objector during WWI & II, Korea, and Vietnam.

16. SISSELA BOK
Scholar, educator and author for her contributions to peacemaking strategies in the tradition of her mother, Alva Myrtal. Read More

17. THICH NHAT HANH
Exiled Vietnamese Buddhist monk, humanitarian, ethical vegetarian and spiritual teacher for his example of compassion and forgiveness following the destructive war in Vietnam. Read More

18. ZELL DRAZ
Philanthropist and social activist for her supportive and creative involvement in the Quaker-based Alternatives to Violence program in prisons.

19. DANIEL BERRIGAN
Jesuit priest, poet, philosopher, author and anti-war activist for his moral leadership in the pacifist movement for peace, justice and social change.

20. RICHIE HAVENS
Singer, environmentalist and political activist for his musical contribution to the peace movement and for being a friend to those who struggle against injustice, exploitation and neglect.

21. FATHER FRANK CORDARO
Priest, pacifist and Catholic Worker activist for his witness and commitment to the disarmament movement and his efforts to bring the Catholic Church into alignment with its highest calling.

22. CAMELIA SADAT
Muslim, educator and activist for carrying on the peacemaking legacy of her soldier-turned-peacemaker father, Anwar Sadat.

23. RAM DASS
Teacher, author and spiritual guide for teaching us to be here now and that compassion is the true source of service.

24. PAUL WINTER
Composer, musician, environmentalist and pacifist for creating music that celebrates the sacredness of life and for his support of the arts. Read More

25. JIM & KATHLEEN MCGINNIS
Catholic educators, pacifists, authors and co-founders of the Institute for Peace and Justice for their extraordinary commitment to teaching and spreading peace.

26. MICHAL SCHWARTZ
Israeli Jew, human rights activist and journalist for her work to promote peace and social justice and a homeland for Palestinians.

27. WESTON PRIORY MONKS
Congregation of Benedictine monks for their active involvement in the sanctuary movement for Guatemalans and Salvadorans in exile.

28. BENJAMIN SPOCK
Pediatrician, ethical vegetarian, socialist and author for his lifelong commitment to disarmament and peaceable child-rearing.

29. HELEN CALDICOTT
Pacifist, physician, author and founder of the Women for Nuclear Disarmament (WAND) for her dynamic leadership in the worldwide disarmament movement.

30. DAVE DELLINGER
Anti-war activist, socialist and author for his lifelong commitment to pacifist values and for serving as a spokesperson for the peace movement.

31. S. BRIAN WILLSON
Vietnam veteran, anti-war activist and author for his extraordinary personal sacrifices to demonstrate opposition to militarism and U.S. involvement in Latin America.

32. LISA & CURTIS SLIWA
Social change and inner-city activists for their work to establish the Guardian Angels in major cities on every continent in the world.

33. ROSA PARKS
Elder spokeswoman and activist for her continual example of community service and for her lifelong commitment to civil rights and non-violent social change.

34. BETSY CORNER & RANDY KEHLER
Pacifists, anti-war activists and example-setting parents for their sacrifices and leadership in the war tax resistance movement.

35. ARUN & SUNANDA GANDHI
Teachers, authors, pacifists and co-founders of the M. K. Gandhi Institute for Non-Violence in Memphis, Tennessee for bringing the legacy of Gandhi to America. Read More

36. GORDON ZAHN
Scholar, teacher and Catholic pacifist for his lifelong commitment to the ideals of non-violence and conscientious objection and for his work with the Second Vatican Council to make the Catholic Church a church of peace.

37. ED McCURDY
Singer, songwriter and television actor for his anti-war classic,”Last Night I Had the Strangest Dream,” which inspired and gave hope to those in the peace movement.

38. RAMSEY CLARK
Former Attorney General and peace and social justice activist for his commitment to civil rights, his opposition to war and military spending and his dedication to providing legal representation to the peace movement, particularly, his efforts to free Leonard Peltier.

39. ARLO GUTHRIE
Singer, song writer and political activist for his life and his music that carry on the legacy of his minstrel father, Woody Guthrie. Presented at Harvard University September 26, 1992.

40. LOUISE CARCIONE
Social worker and political activist for her dedicated leadership in community development in the City of Boston.

41. ELIAS & HEYEM JABBOUR
Peace activists and co-founders of The House of Hope International Peace Center in Israel for their work to bring Muslims, Jews and Christians together in the struggle against voices of extremism and blind hatred throughout the region.

42. BARRY CRIMMINS
Pacifist, ethical vegetarian, political satirist and child welfare activist for his work to expose situations that exploit people in the developing world and children here in America. Read More

43. MAYA ANGELOU
Humanitarian, philosopher, poet and author for her soaring inspiration to live life with intensity, integrity and intelligence.

44. MUHAMMAD ALI
Muslim, humanitarian, anti-war activist and former Heavyweight Boxing Champion of the World for his commitment to peacemaking and his leadership as a conscientious objector during the Vietnam War. Read More

45. RIGABERTA MENCHU
Mayan leader and author for her personal sacrifices and unrelenting commitment to expose human rights violations against indigenous people in Guatemala and throughout Latin America.

46. ALEX PACHECO & INGRID NEWKIRK
Animal rights activists, vegans and co-founders of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals for their pioneering work to expose cruelty to animals and to promote vegetarianism. Read More

47. LAWRENCE MARTIN JENCO
Catholic priest, author and teacher for his capacity to forgive his captures having been held hostage for 19 months and tortured by religious extremists in Beruit.

48. MICHAEL KLAPER
Philosopher, humanitarian, and environmentalist for the clarity and passion of his witness as a vegan physician and surgeon.

49. RON DELLA CHIESA
Classical and jazz scholar for being a steward of intergenerational music that binds society and elevates cultural integrity.

50. HARRY WU
Human rights activist and author for his extraordinary sacrifices and commitment to exposing human rights violations in his motherland China.

51. MATTHEW FOX
Environmental theologian, teacher and author for his inspiring teachings on Creation Spirituality. Read More

52. SIRI SINGH SAHIB
Spiritual teacher, yogi and author for bringing Sikh Dharma to the Western Hemisphere.

53. WILLIAM JOHNSTON
Police officer and humanitarian for years of community service as a decoy in the Boston Police Department out of a desire to find kinship with the victims of society.

54. PAT FARREN
Former Peace Corps volunteer, pacifist and founding editor of “Peace Work” (the peace and social justice magazine of the American Friends Service Committee) for lifelong service to the causes of peace, social justice and human rights.

55. COLMAN McCARTHY
Pacifist, journalist and ethical vegetarian for his nationally syndicated column in the Washington Post.

56. LOUISE COLEMAN
Animal rights activist for her pioneering work to save greyhounds from death following their exploitation at racing parks throughout New England.
Read More

57. HOWARD ZINN
Scholar, author, anti-war activist and leader of the peace movement for giving voice to the victims of oppression and for his revealing book, People’s History of the United States.

58. RALPH DIGIA
Secular humanist and pacifist for his example as a conscientious objector and for over forty years of dedicated service at the War Resister’s League in New York City.

59. ROSE & BILL ABBOTT
Humanitarians, farmers and co-founders of Food for the Needy for their 25 years of growing acres of vegetables and donating the harvests to the poor in the Worcester/Boston area.

60. LORRI and GENE BAUSTON
Ethical vegetarians, animal rights activists, humanitarians and co-founders of Farm Sanctuary for their commitment to saving farm animals and for their leadership as vegan pacifists.

61. MIKHAIL GORBACHEV
Last President of the Soviet Union for his historic role in the evolution of Glasnost – openness in government – and for his leadership in the disarmament negotiations with the United States during the Reagan Administration.

62. MICHAEL TOBIAS
Humanitarian, scholar, author, film producer and ethical vegetarian for his dedication to issues of overpopulation, the environment and ahimsa (dynamic harmlessness).

63. MAHA GHOSANANDA
Pacifist, ethical vegetarian, author and Supreme Patriarch of Cambodian Buddhism for teaching non-violence and establishing Buddhist temples throughout the world that root his exiled people in their religion of peace.

64. HOWARD LYMAN
Ethical vegetarian and fourth generation cattle rancher- turned-vegan for his leadership in the animal rights movement.

65. CHRIS DeROSE
Former actor, vegan, animal rights activist and founder of Last Chance for Animals for his commitment to saving animals and exposing animal abuse in entertainment, medical research and food production.

66. PATCH ADAMS
Physician, professional clown and socialist for his commitment to providing health care for indigent and uninsured people, free of charge, without malpractice insurance, out of his home for over 25 years. Read More

67. GURUDEV SHREE CHITRABHANU
Jain teacher, ethical vegetarian, pacifist and author for his unprecedented journey to bring the Jain tradition of ahimsa to the Western Hemisphere.

68. AARON FEURERSTEIN
Industrialist and philanthropist for setting the standard for commitment to employees following a devastating fire at his Malden Mills manufacturing plant.

69. HUGH C. THOMPSON, JR.
American soldier and Veterans Administration counselor for his extraordinary moral courage while stopping the My Lai massacre in Vietnam in 1968 and saving the lives of dozens of civilian Vietnamese. Read More

70. LAWRENCE COLBURN
American soldier for his courage during the 1968 My Lai massacre with comrades Hugh C. Thompson, Jr. and Glen Andreotta in saving the lives of dozens of civilian Vietnamese.

71. PEACE PAGODA
International Japanese Nipponzan Buddhist Order devoted to prayer and service for the Interfaith Pilgrimage of the Middle Passage – Tracing the Journey of Slavery (United States, Caribbean, Brazil, West Africa, South Africa).

72. STANLEY KUNITZ
Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and  conscientious objector for his contribution to the liberation of the human spirit through his poetry. Read More

73. NGAWANG CHOEPHEL
Tibetan scholar for his courage in returning to Tibet to preserve the history and diversity of Tibetan oral tradition in music and dance.  Presented in absentia to his mother Sonam Deyki. Read More Web Link Photos by Scott Langley

74. JUAN CARRERO SARALEGUI
Spanish activist, conscientious objector and Gandhian pacifist for his lifelong commitment to non-violence and his work to halt and expose the truth behind the genocide in the Great Lakes Nations of Africa. Read More

75. YOKO KAWASHIMA WATKINS
Author for her poignant and eloquent accounting of her courageous struggle against oppression during World War II and her inspiration to young people throughout America and the world. Read More

76.  KATHY KELLY
Founder and leader of Voices in the Wilderness for her extraordinary commitment to befriend the Iraqui people and bring to light their great suffering under the immoral UN/US economic sanctions.

77.  JUN YASUDA
Buddhist nun, member of the Nipponzan Myohoji Community and Founder of the Grafton Peace Pagoda for living and walking for Peace and Non-Violence, nationally and internationally.

78.  LOUISE FRANKLIN-RAMERIZ
Feminist, environmentalist, anti-war activist and leader in the movements for gender equality, social justice, non-violence and peace for her demonstrated vision, energy and idealism on the pathway to peacemaking over a period of seven decades.

79.  RICHARD McSORLEY
Jesuit priest, author, Catholic worker, teacher, pacifist and Founder and Director of the Center for Peace Studies at Georgetown University for his lifelong commitment to activist Gospel living in the face of adversity.

80.  JIM WALLIS
Minister and author for his work in advocating for peace and social  justice  in urban America and for his role as founder of Sojourners Magazine and  the Call to Renewal.

81.  ELISE BOULDING
Quaker pacifist, author, professor and futurist for her lifelong commitment and contributions to peace and justice, envisioning the Peaceable Kingdom as a shared reality.

82.  BARBARA SONNEBORN
Director, writer and producer of the documentary film “Regret to Inform” for her  courage in helping us understand the tragedy of war through sharing her tragic and poignant story and similiar stories of other widows of the Vietnam War.

83.  JIMMY TINGLE
Political satirist, practitioner of non-violence and activist for peace & social change, whose humor and satire help in combating destructive elements in society.

84.  STING and TRUDIE STYLER
Singer/song writer, documentary film producers for their commitment to the environment through the establishment of the Rainforest Foundation; to human rights in China through the documentary film on Tiananmen Square; and to peace and social justice through the powerful gift of song.

85.  MICHIO and AVELINE KUSHI
Founders of The Kushi Institute for their extraordinary contribution to diet, health and world peace, and for serving as powerful examples of conscious living.

86. HARVARD LIVING WAGE CAMPAIGN and the
STUDENTS PARTICIPATING IN THE LIVING WAGE SIT-IN AT HARVARD UNIVERSITY
University labor movement collaboration for the clarity of their message, passion of their witness, and courage and commitment in demanding that Harvard pay all its employees a living wage.

87. MICHAEL TRUE
Pacifist, educator, author and lifelong peace activist for his compassionate and compelling leadership in the movement for peace and non-violent social change, and for serving as mentor and beacon of integrity for pacifists throughout America.

88. MICHAEL PATRICK MacDONALD
Author, community organizer and peace activist for his courage and committed efforts to stem the tide of inner city violence through the establishment of the gun-buyback program in Boston.

89. SR. JEANNETTE NORMANDIN
Sister of St. Anne, counselor, prison chaplain and founder of the Ruah House, serving women living with HIV, for the clarity of her vision, her decades of work with prisoners and the poor in the inner city, and for her courageous devotion to the call for women to serve humanity within the Roman Catholic Church as equals in the eyes of Christ.

90. JOHN ROBBINS
Author, animal rights activist, environmentalist, vegan and founder of EarthSave, for his extraordinary leadership in the global movement for a plant-base diet that promotes health, cruelty-free living and a commitment to a diet for a new America. Read More

91. KEYDONG THUK-CHE-CHO-LING NUNNERY
First Tibetan Buddhist nuns in history to embark on the sacred journey of mandala building, and for their ancient tradition of providing sanctuary for cows and sheep that escape from slaughterhouses near their Kathmandu convent.

92. EDDIE LAMA
New York City contractor, community organizer, ethical vegan and animal rights activist for his passionate efforts to educate the general public about the injustice of animal exploitation. Read More

93. ROY BOURGEOIS
Veteran, priest, and founder of The School of the Americas Watch for his leadership and unrelenting commitment to close down the SOA training base for US sponsored terrorism in Latin America.

94. REPRESENTATIVE BARBARA LEE
US Representative from California for her courage to stand alone and vote against the call to war after the tragedy of September 11. In her speech she said, “let us not become the evil that we deplore”.

95. MICHAEL LERNER & TIKKUN MAGAZINE
Rabbi, author, and editor of Tikkun magazine for his unflinching courage and relentless spiritual optimism for the Middle East and for proclaiming a vision of compassion and love in the darkest of times.

96. PETER AND ILKA SHUMANN AND THE BREAD & PUPPET THEATRE
Founders of The Bread and Puppet Theater for their commitment to promote social awareness through compelling political and artistic productions that address social and economic injustices.

97. JULIA BUTTERFLY HILL
Author, environmentalist, vegan, and social change activist for her extraordinary commitment to saving the Redwood Forest through her Luna Tree-sit, and ongoing efforts to educate, inspire, and further the movement for peace and social justice.

98. JULIA ESTY AND SHELAGH FOREMAN Read More
Anti-war, nuclear freeze and social justice activists for their unrelenting work against the spread of militarism and a culture of violence. Both women devote their lives to promoting the causes of peace and nonviolence and serve as an inspiration to thousands on the pathway of peacemaking.

99. CHRIS HEDGES
War correspondent, New York Times reporter and author for his passionate commitment to demythologize and explain the abomination of war and its destructive effects on civil society.

100. WILLIAM SLOANE COFFIN
Christian minister, author, anti-war activist and mentor to a generation of peacemakers for his life-long Gospel witness, and his passionate and prophetic leadership in the peace and social justice movements.

101. RUTH HILLER AND NEW PROFILE
American born, Israeli Jew for her unswirving devotion to the ideals of New Profile which strives to change the military mindset in Israel and create a civil society.

102. SEPTEMBER 11TH FAMILIES FOR PEACEFUL TOMORROWS Read More
For their courage in turning grief into action by creating solidarity with victims of terrorism, violence, and war throughout the world.

103. PAUL AND TATIANA RUSESABAGINA
In honor of their extraordinary efforts that saved the lives of over twelve hundred innocent people at the Hotel Milles Collines during the genocide in Rwanda in 1994.

104. CAMILO MEJIA Read More Camilo News Page
Iraq War Conscientious Objector, Amnesty International Prisoner of Conscience and ethical vegetarian.

105. DADI JANKI
Spiritual leader, ethical vegetarian, member of the UN “Wisdom Keepers” for 70 years of humanitarian work throughout the world

106. CINDY SHEEHAN
Mother, author, ethical vegetarian for the power of her witness against the war as generated through her profound sense of loss following the death of her son Casey in Iraq.

107. MILITARY FAMILIES SPEAK OUT Read More
For bringing together thousands of families and loved ones of those serving in the military to speak out against the illegal war in Iraq.

108. ROBERT COLES
Child psychiatrist, oral historian, social anthropologist and teacher for the depth of his commitment to the health and well-being of children through their telling of their own stories.

109. JUANITA AND WALLY NELSON
Farmers, civil rights activists, pacifists and war tax resisters for their love & generosity and their spirited life of service to the movements of social justice, activist nonviolence and peace.

110. WILLIAM KELLY
International artist, humanist, human rights advocate, and founder of the Archive of Humanist Art, which features art that addresses humanist peace concerns.

111. ANURADHA KOIRALA
Founder and director of Maiti Nepal, (“Mother’s House”) to rescue, rehabilitate, and support some of the thousands of girls and women who have been trafficked from Nepal to India to be sexual slaves in brothels.

112. SOS GALGOS
A Greyhound adoption and advocacy group based in Spain for their tireless and courageous effort to save and protect these animals

113. HUSTON SMITH
For his life long commitment to bringing the world’s religions together to promote understanding, social justice and peace.

114. SURVIVORS OF GERNIKA BOMBING
For their promotion of reonciliation, their commitment to peace for the children of Gernika and the world, and for sharing their remarkable journey with grace and dignity.

115. FRANCES CROWE
For her lifelong commitment to the Peace Movement and her unrelenting opposition to war through war tax resistance and eco-pacifist lifestyle.
Read More

116. GRASSROOTS SOCCER: Ethan Zohn and Dr. Tommy Clark
For their combined humanitarian efforts to spread HIV education throughout Africa via soccer teams for youth and young adults. Read More

117. CODEPINK: Jodie Evans
For the passionate and driven direction women have given the peace movement through this organization that blends tenacity with hope, pranks of conscience with in-your-face challenges to war waging political figures in Washington.Read More

118. JACKSON BROWNE
For promoting peace and justice through his music and his unrelenting support for that which promotes nonviolent solutions to problems both nationally and internationally.Read More

119. WILL TUTTLE
For spreading an understanding of the many costs of our exploitation of animals through his book “The World Peace Diet” which furthers the vegan revolution and its outreach worldwide. Read More

120. BURMESE ORDER OF BUDDHIST MONKS (in absentia)
For leading the people of Burma in nonviolent Gandhian protest against the cruel and oppressive Burmese military junta.

121. GREG MORTENSON AND THE CENTRAL ASIA INSTITUTE
For extraordinary humanitarian effort and commitment to build schools for girls and create bridges of peace in Pakistan and Afganistan.Read More

122. GENE SHARP
For his lifelong commitment to the defense of freedom, democracy, and the reduction of political violence through scholarly analysis of the power of nonviolent action. Read More

123. FACING HISTORY AND OURSELVES
For engaging students of diverse backgrounds in an examination of racism, prejudice, and antisemitism in order to promote the development of a more humane and informed citizenry.Read More

124. TOMMIE SMITH
For his life-long commitment to athletics, education, and human rights following his silent gesture of protest at the ’68 Olympics in Mexico City. Read More

125. INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL OF 13 INDIGENOUS GRANDMOTHERS
For their individual and collective efforts to give a voice for all indigenous peoples and Mother Earth through education and prayer.

126. SIR BEN KINGSLEY
For his extraordinary portrayal of Mohandas K. Gandhi in the 1982 motion picture GANDHI that brought to life the power of nonviolence and pacifism.

127. PAUL FARMER & PARTNERS IN HEALTH
For saving lives by providing free health care to people in the world’s poorest communities and working to improve health care systems globally. Read More

128. PETE SEEGER
For his commitment to peace and social justice as a musician, songwriter, activist, and environmentalist that spans over fifty years. Read More

129. COMBATANTS FOR PEACE
Courageous individuals from Israel and Palestine who transformed their lives and now work together to educate the public and political leaders about how to create dialogue and stop the cycle of violence. Read More

130. HOUSE OF PEACE
Founded by Carrie and John Schuchardt to provide physical refuge and spiritual sanctuary to victims of war. Read More

131. SUZANNE AND BRAYTON SHANLEY AND THE AGAPE COMMUNITY
Co-Founders of a Catholic retreat center with a focus on nonviolence, peacemaking and sustainable-living. Read More

132. FATHER JOHN DEAR S.J.
Jesuit Priest, author, lecturer, peace activist and vegetarian, for his solidarity, and leadership in nonviolent resistance and Gospel living. Read More

133. MOTHER ANTONIA BRENNER
Catholic nun, founder of the order of Eudist Servants of the Eleventh Hour for her prison ministry in Tijuana living in a cell for over thirty years. Read More

134. BENEBIKIRA SISTERS OF RWANDA
Catholic nuns and educators for their compassionate voices and work in caring for and sheltering the victims of the genocide in Rwanda in 1994. Read More

135. GREENPEACE
International peace and environmental organization for decades of engaged activism that serves to inspire citizens of the world to embrace their moral authority and bring about needed social change in the world.  Read More

136. DESMOND TUTU
Anti-apartheid spiritual leader of South Africa who provided his country and the world with a moral understanding of the evils of apartheid and the importance and power of truth and reconciliation on the path to healing his nation.

137. FRANK ROBINSON
Visionary and founder of Camp Arrowhead and Camp Warren for working with the Amputee Veteran’s Association to create America’s first day camp for children with physical disabilities and creating camping opportunities for children and young adults for over a half a century.

138. DENNIS KUCINICH
U.S. Congressman from Ohio for speaking out against the obscenity of war, Wall Street greed, and materialism, while giving voice to the needs of all people as well as animals as a Vegan Peacemaker.

139. NELSON MANDELA
Anti-aparteid leader and first president of a free South Africa for his courage, commitment and extraordinary willingness to forgive and reconcile after 27 years in prison to bring for all.

140. JOAN BAEZ
Singer, songwriter and musician for her extraordinary commitment to peace, social and economic justice, human rights and the environment, on and off stage throughout the world, for over a half of century

141. ANNE MONTGOMERY
Catholic nun, pacifist, educator and peace activist for a lifetime of service to those in need in America and in war torn countries throughout the world.

142. FIONA JENSEN & CALMER CHOICE
Occupational Therapist, educator and founder of Calmer Choice for her impassioned commitment to address the urgent issues of violence, suicide and self-destructive behaviors in  young people trough mindfulness training on Cape Cod, Massachusetts.


CHILDREN’S PEACE AWARD:

1. JIM HENSON
Humanitarian, muppeteer, producer and director of films for children that encourage tolerance, interracial values, equality and fair play.

2. EARTH GUARDIANS AND THE CHILDREN’S
TORCH OF PEACE
For their journey across America by school bus to empower other children to break out of the norm and risk making a difference in the world.

3. COLOMBIAN CHILDREN’S PEACE MOVEMENT
For their courageous effort to end the war in their homeland and for setting an example of peacemaking for children and adults throughout the world.

4. BETSY SAWYER & THE PAGES FOR PEACE PROJECT
Teacher and students for their creative efforts within the Bookmakers and Dreamers Club from Groton-Dunstable Regional School District in MA to build the biggest book in the world. Read More

POSTHUMOUS:

1. ANWAR SADAT
President of Egypt for his historic and visionary trip to Israel in 1978 that, challenging the structures of an ancient enmity, led to the Camp David Accords and a peace treaty between the two nations.

2. ALVA MYRDAL
Swedish Disarmament Minister, Ambassador to India, college founder, author and social reformer for her lifelong work on behalf of women’s rights, education reform and the international disarmament movement.

3. MAHATMA GANDHI
Lawyer, ethical vegetarian, and architect of the non-violent resistance movement in India and South Africa for his creative approaches to civil disobedience in the founding of a peace movement that helped establish the freedom of an entire nation.

4. PEACE PILGRIM
Wandering mendicant and peace activist for her unprecedented 28 year trip across America, in which she walked over 25,000 miles, talking to everyone she met about peaceful living.

5. BEN LINDER
American mechanical engineering student for his efforts to provide hydroelectric power to a small rural town in Nicaragua, for which he paid with his life at the hands of an American-backed Contra soldier.

6. ABBIE HOFFMAN
Political activist, author, founder of the Youth International Movement (Yippies) and member of the Chicago Seven, for relentlessly pitting his rebellious spirit against the Vietnam War and other oppressive forces in the United States during the Sixties.

7. JOHN ONO LENNON
Musician and peace activist for his music and anti-war protests which helped to bring to the attention of an entire generation the ideals of peace and love.

8. OSCAR ROMERO
Archbishop of El Salvador for his courageous battle on behalf of the poor communities in his country seeking democratic freedom and social justice from the military powers that oppressed them.

9. DOROTHY DAY
Publisher, pacifist, civil disobedient, and altruist for her work with the poor and founding of the Catholic Worker’s movement.

10. ROBERT FRANCIS KENNEDY
U.S. Attorney General, Senator and presidential candidate for his activities on behalf of social and economic justice that led to a political and social awakening while on the campaign trail in 1968. Web Link

11. REV. DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.
Pastor and visionary civil-rights leader for his ethical and spiritual leadership in the historic civil rights campaign that forever changed the American nation.  King brought the Gandhian tradition of non-violent social activism to the American struggle for civil rights.

12. WOODY GUTHRIE
Songwriter and social activist for the great artistry and empathy of his classic songs, which conveyed the plight of the common person, from migrant workers in California to union organizers in New York.

13. GLENN ANDREOTTA
American soldier in Vietnam for his unusual bravery and compassion in helping, along with helicopter crew members Hugh C. Thompson Jr. and Lawrence Colburn, to save civilian lives during the My Lai massacre in Vietnam in 1968.

14. JOSEPH MOAKLEY
US Representative, respected voice of conscience in Congress for his unrelenting commitment to ending the war in El Salvador and throughout Central America, and for the compassionate care he gave his constituents in Massachusetts for nearly three decades.

15. SAMANTHA SMITH
American schoolgirl, child peace activist and Goodwill Ambassador for helping to bring about better understanding between the peoples of the United States of America (USA) and the Soviet Union of Socialist Republics (USSR), and as a result, reduce the tension between the superpowers that were poised to engage in nuclear war.

 Posted by at 5:30 pm

Abbey proudly honors local visionary, Frank Robinson, with Courage of Conscience Award

 

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Ian B. Murphy, August 12, 2011

The Peace Abbey in Sherborn honored Frank Robinson on Tuesday with its Courage of Conscience Award, marking his contributions to the community by creating two historic and inclusive summer camps in the area, including Camp Arrowhead in Natick.

Robinson was presented the award at Family Night for Camp Arrowhead at the Elks Club in Natick, allowing the campers, their families, and the staff of the camp he started in 1958 as Natick’s recreation director to participate in the ceremony.

“Most people don’t realize he was the visionary that created that camp, the first camp in the country for disabled children, and it’s been running for 53 years,” said Lewis Randa, executive director of the Peace Abbey. “In presenting him the Courage of Conscience we wanted to make him all the more visible as the creator of that wonderful camp that has helped disabled children for almost six decades. He is the most humble man I’ve ever met, and its a great honor to celebrate his contributions to the community.”

The Peace Abbeys has awarded its Courage of Conscience to many high profile recipients — the most recent winner before Robinson was the Archbishop Desmond Tutu of South Africa — but Randa said a crucial aspect of the award is to recognize local humanitarians who work among us.

“They just do their work in their own quiet way, and they change the world,” Randa said.  “But far too often they don’t get acknowledged, and that’s what the Courage of Conscience award tries to do, acknowledge them. That’s really the spirit behind the award, just expressing gratitude.”

“As far as we’re concerned Frank Robinson doesn’t take a back seat to the archbishop or any of our recipients, in our eyes,” he said. “Frank Robinson deserves to be celebrated, and that’s why we gave him the award.”

Dick Cugini, Natick’s current Recreation and Parks director, said that Robinson’s public/private partnership with the Amputee Veterans Association to start Camp Arrowhead was ahead of its time, a model of success for combining resources to bring programs and services to residents.

“This guy was doing it back in 1958, that’s how far ahead he was,” Cugini said.

Tim Flynn, the current director of Camp Arrowhead, said what Robinson created is so much more than just a program for disabled children: He started something that has taken on a vibrant life of its own, and meshed with the fabric of the community.

“You can create a program, or you can create a mindset,” Flynn said. “A program will run, and that’s fine, but a mindset is something that will live on, just as Camp Arrowhead has for 50 years.”

Robinson said he was “floored” and “honored” when he learned he’d be receiving the award. At the banquet on Tuesday, he said he tried his best to honor the people who really made the camp what it is now.

“It was very flattering, but I tried to give my acceptance speech to who caused this all: It was the kids,” Robinson said. “Everybody got involved, and now they’ve made it a lot better than its humble beginnings, and they’ve made it a lot better.”

“I woke up early (Wednesday) morning to see if it was still there, maybe this was all a dream,” Robinson said. “It’s just mind boggling.”

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PRESS RELEASE

Frank Robinson,Visionary and Founder of Camp Arrowhead and Camp Warren to receive The Peace Abbey Courage of Conscience Award

On Tuesday, August 9, 2011 at 7 PM at the Elks Club on Speen Street, Natick, MA, Camp Arrowhead campers with disabilities and their parents, counselors and teenage volunteers will share in the celebration as their beloved founder and mentor, Frank Robinson, receives the Courage of Conscience Award from the Peace Abbey.

For over half a century Frank Robinson has educated, inspired, and led countless students, from university level to elementary school, and volunteers from all walks of life to serve members of their community with
disabilities through recreational and camping opportunities. In 1958, with the Amputee Veterans Association, and the Natick Recreation Department Mr. Robinson established Camp Arrowhead as the first day camp for children with physical disabilities in the United States. In 1970, Robinson and his students at Northeastern University founded Camp Warren, a resident camp in Ashland, MA. In 1980 the camp became Camp Echo in Goshen, MA and evolved into 4H Camp Howe. The American Camping Association recognized Camp Howe in 2006 by awarding it The Best Program in America.

Visionary, university professor, author and mentor to thousands, Frank Robinson joins the list of distinguished recipients of the Courage of Conscience Award that includes servant of the poor, Mother Teresa of Calcutta, founding editor of Peacework Magazine Pat Farren of Watertown,MA, Jesuit priest and peace activist Daniel Berrigan, civil rights activist Rosa Parks, peace and social justice activists Julia Esty & Shelagh Foreman of Framingham, MA, Tibetan spiritual leader the XIV Dalai Lama, Greyhound Friends founder, Louise Coleman of Hopkinton, MA, poet and author Maya Angelou, humanitarian Muhammad Ali, historian and activist Howard Zinn and anti-apartheid Archbishop Desmond Tutu of South Africa. (Complete list can be found at www.peaceabbey.org.)

Peace Abbey honors individuals and organizations that are recognized internationally for their humanitarian and peace activism, along with local, grassroots, unsung heroes of social change. The Peace Abbey supports and encourages the noble work of individuals and groups who are, all too often, too little known, by recognizing them with the Courage of Conscience Award.

 

Frank Robinson’s life of service within academia and the community stands as a local example of the greatness of the human heart and the courage of conscience. It is an honor to express our gratitude to Frank Robinson for all that he has accomplished over a life time of service to make the world a better place.

 Posted by at 7:25 am

The continuing presence of The Peace Abbey around the World

 

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Music Video of The Peace Abbey

Peace memorials and museums are a relatively new idea.  War, on the other hand, has enjoyed glorification through monuments, literature, art, and war memorials and museums for centuries.   The motivation for creating statuary and monuments to peace and non-violence as an endeavor was and still is the faith that making people aware of the cost of war is tantamount to educating them for peace.

The second wave of peace memorials and museums sprung up after the destructive years of World War II.  Appropriately, the majority of these memorials were established in Japan, where a keen understanding of the fatal consequences of nuclear warfare was realized.  The cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were centers of staunch opposition to nuclear warfare that spread throughout the world.

Today, peace memorials can be found in every continent of the world.  Though war still lingers, there is hope to be found in the growth of the peace memorial and museum movement.  Efforts aimed at furthering the cause of peace are truly an incremental enterprise.  The greater the presence of peace memorials and museums, the more palpable the message of peace is for the general public.

 Tehran Peace Museum

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PEACE ABBEY PUBLIC ART & MEMORIALS

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Like the seeds of a dandelion, may the many gifts bestowed by The Peace Abbey spread blessings and wishes for peace in their new locations.  And may they embody the energy and spirit of the wonderful people that made the Abbey such a vibrant and extraordinary place for people of all walks of life for over a quarter-of-a-century.   – Lewis Randa

Ever wondered where the seeds of peace activism of the Peace Abbey and Life Experience School extend to and their value to peace in the world?   See below:

DUXBURY, MASSACHUSETTS

Blessed Mother and Child statue dedicated on Mothers Day 2013 at Holy Family Church in Duxbury, MA.  The sculpture was originally given to the Peace Abbey / Life Experience School by the Sister Disciples of the Divine Master.  The original statue was sculpted by world renowned artist, Sr. Angelica in Rome, Italy.

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DEDHAM, MASSACHUSETTS

Mother Teresa statue placed between Church and Rectory at St. Mary’s Church.

 Mother Teresa statue commissioned following Mother Teresa’s visit to the Life Experience School in 1988 was re-dedicated on May 9. 2014 at St. Mary’s Church in Dedham, MA.  The presentation was led by Mary O’Connor and Fr. William Kelly.

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TIJUANA, MEXICO

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Mother Antonia at the Mother House of the Eudist Servants of the Eleventh Hour which she founded as part of her prison work.

A statue of Mother Teresa was presented to Courage of Conscience Award recipient Mother Antonia outside of La Masa Prison in Tijuana, Mexico.  (Underwritten by Edward Coppola.)

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SOUTH BEND, INDIANA

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Statue of Mother Teresa at Norte Dame University.

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Bronze statue of Mother Teresa at shrine on the campus of Notre Dame University. (Underwritten by Edward Coppola.)

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CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS

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Honoring Conscientious Objectors.

 Stone honoring Conscientious Objectors created by the Peace Abbey was gifted to Cambridge Friends Meeting and is located in the side garden to the left of the Administrative Offices.  It was pulled by Stonewalkers from the Abbey to Friends Meeting Cambridge.  This is the first of many stones to be created by the Life Experience School.

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SHERBORN, MASSACHUSETTS

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 Two North Main Street, Sherborn, Massachusetts
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Gandhi Statue at the Pacifist Memorial in Sherborn, MA.

Gandhi statue was unveiled at the Pacifist Memorial on October 2, 1994, the 125 birth anniversary of Mohandas K. Gandhi.  Listed on the plaque below are the individuals that participated in the dedication ceremonies.  (Included are Muhammad Ali, Maya Angelou, Daniel Berrigan, Dave Dellinger, Arun Gandhi and other significant peacemakers.)
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Dedication plaque of the Pacifist Memorial.

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The Pacifist Memorial in Sherborn, MA.

Bronze Gandhi statue at the Pacifist Memorial in Sherborn, MA where over 65 pacifists throughout history are acknowledged through a quotations on bronze plaques.  The Pacifist Memorial is an Open-Air Peace Chapel of the World’s Major Religions.
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Sand blasting engraving of additional names on the CO Hill Memorial Stone for Conscientious Objectors.
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CO stone installed by Dan, Leah, Jonah and Lewis.

Granite Memorial Stone for Conscientious Objectors.  Buried here are the ashes of over a dozen pacifists who devoted their lives to social change through the power of nonviolence.  The names engraved on the Memorial Stone include Pat Farren, David Dellinger, Wally Nelson & Chuck Matthei, Lynda Bock Weitz, Paramal Das, Ralph DiGia, Ann & John Rush, Patricia Watson, Zell Draz, Norman Nylund, Tom Lewis, Sheila DeSalvo and Howard Willard, Jr.
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The memorial stone on the grounds of the Peace Abbey.

  Memorial Stone for Unknown Civilians Killed in War on the grounds of the Pacifist Memorial next to the statue of Mahatma Gandhi in Sherborn, MA.  Located where Routes 27 & 16 fork in Sherborn, MA.
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Victim of Violence Stone was dedicated by Fr. Daniel Berrigan on May 4, 1994 during the unveiling of the Gandhi statue. It was created to honor all victims of violence, whether domestic or state sponsored through the death penalty or the waging of armed conflict.

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EMILY THE COW & ANIMAL RIGHTS MEMORIAL

Emily in her barn at the Peace Abbey Veganpeace Animal Sanctuary.

Emily in her barn at the Peace Abbey Veganpeace Animal Sanctuary.

Emily the Cow with the Randa family in her new barn. (Barn construction underwritten by Ellen and Rob Little.)

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Emily lying in state in the barn during memorial service attended by members of the community that loved her and paid their respects.

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Jain Path from front parking lot to Emily’s grave.

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Gandhi Path from Pacifist Memorial to Animal Rights Memorial at Emily the Cow’s grave.

Bronze statue of Emily the Cow was dedicated on Earth Day 2005 behind the statue of Gandhi.
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Dedication plaque at Emily’s grave.

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Statue of Emily the Cow was sculpted by Lado and Shake Goudjabidze.

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Order your copy of The Story of Emily the Cow.
All proceeds go for the care of Emily’s grave and the Animal Rights Memorial.
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PEACE SEEDS ROSARY OF THE MAJOR RELIGIONS OF THE WORLD

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Gandhi and earth image on the Peace Seeds medallion.

The Peace Seeds represent the twelve prayers for peace prayed in Assisi, Italy on the Day of Prayer for World Peace during the United Nations International Year of Peace, 1986. The Prayers were brought to the United States and entrusted to the care of the children at The Life Experience School. Peace Seeds can be acquired from the Peace Abbey for a small donation.

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Peace beads are strung together to form the Peace Seeds Rosary by Roy and Dorothy who devote themselves to prayerful service to others.

Prayers for Peace

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COURAGE OF CONSCIENCE AWARD

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The Courage of Conscience Award statuette of the Peace Dove in outreached hands was commissioned to express the work of our hands that will bring about peace.

All awards are bestowed with the love of the students at The Life Experience School without whom the Award would not exist.  Complete list of Courage of Conscience Award Recipients.
2007 Courage of Conscience Awards Jackson Browne

Jackson Brown received the Courage of Conscience Award in LA and was sponsored by John and Melissa Levoff.

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Mother Teresa with Courage of Conscience Award.

Mother Teresa of Calcutta. Catholic nun, humanitarian and spiritual teacher, recipient of The Courage of Conscience Award.  The Peace Abbey Courage of Conscience Award was created as part of the Gratitude Project of the Life Experience School for children and young adults with disabilities.

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DES MOINES, IOWA

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Hand-carved statue that was in the Peace Abbey Chapel for 25 years now serves as the focal point of healing and gratitude in Des Moines, Iowa.

Peace Abbey Crucifix

Room established to welcome those who are being treated for life-threatening illness or wish to give thanks for the state of their health.  (Under the stewardship and care of Gary and Connie Randa.)

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The Peace Abbey Prayer Book, which holds the prayers of thousands of people from all walks of life, is held under the care and stewardship of Gary and Connie Randa.

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The prayers were written at the foot of the crucifix in the Abbey Chapel in Sherborn, Massachusetts over a period of 25 years. It continues to offer pages for people to enter their deepest wishes, expressions of gratitude and prayers for healing in the Prayer Room in Des Moines, Iowa.

The Peace Abbey Prayer Book

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The above description was written by a graduate student from the Divinity School at Harvard University as part of her internship at The Peace Abbey.

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For over a quarter of a century, thousands of candles were lit in the Abbey Chapel and the metal wick holders were held in honor and remembrance of the prayers that the flames represented.  The metal discs from the Chapel candle stand were kept out of respect for the prayers and never discarded.

Prayer Links

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NEW YORK CITY, NY

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Gandhi Bust presented to the United Nations by sculptor Lado Goudjabidze.

Bust of Gandhi at United Nations, “Sanction for Nonviolence”  New York, NY

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BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS

Occupy Boston

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With the uprising of discontent in America over what was perceived to be unbridled corporate greed and disregard for human needs, the Wall Street Occupy Movement spread to Boston on September 30, 2011.  1% of the world’s wealth is owned and controlled by 80 people.

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Students at the Life Experience School delivered the statue of Gandhi to Occupy Boston in the hope that the image of Gandhi would remind protesters to practice nonviolence at all times.

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Chris Randa and other activists move Gandhi statue hours before Occupy Boston ended.

Boston Globe Photo of the Year 2011.

Within days, a nine foot statue of Mahatma Gandhi was brought to the encampment as a symbol of peaceful, nonviolent civil disobedience by the Peace Abbey of Sherborn, MA.  The ten week long citizen’s occupation to protest economic injustice ended on December 10, 2011. It was the longest continual Occupy demonstration in the country.

University of Massachusetts at Boston

Prayer altar in Peace Abbey Chapel.

Prayer altar in Peace Abbey Chapel.

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Peace Abbey prayer altar donated to the Chapel at the University of Massachusetts at Boston. Presented to Reverend Adrienne Berry-Burton by the students at the Life Experience School.

Multi-Faith Prayer Altar

Commissioned altar with the words: Always Pray – Pray all Ways with Earth design and the names of the 12 major religions carved into each of the 12 sides of the base of the altar.  Designed by Lewis Randa.  A replica was created by Wellesley College, Multi-faith Chapel.
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The Peacemakers Table at the Peace Abbey / Life Experience School where the students met each morning for forty years before gifting it to UMASS Boston for its new peace room.
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Re-dedication of the Peacemakers Table at the University of Massachusetts at Boston.

The Peacemakers Table at UMASS Boston

Among the noted peacemakers that met at the Abbey Peacemakers Table are: Mother Teresa, Muhammad Ali, Maya Angelou, Howard Zinn, Arun Gandhi, Camila Sadat, Raul Julia, Thich Nhat Hanh, Daniel Berrigan, Richie Havens, Ram Das, Helen Caldicott, Ramsey Clark, Barry Crimmins, Michael Klaper, Harry Wu, Ralph DiGia, Dave Dellinger, Patch Adams, Hugh Thompson Jr., Stanley Kunitz, Ngawang Choephel, Betsy Sawyer, Elise Boulding, Michael True, Roy Bourgeois, Paul Rusesabagina, Camilo Mejia, Cindy Sheehan, Francis Crowe, Gene Sharp, Will Tuttle, Tommie Smith, John Dear, Mother Anonia Brenner and numerous other extraordinary peacemakers.  The Peacemakers Table was dedicated to the late Quaker scholar and peace activist, Elise Boulding

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WASHINGTON, DC

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STONEWALK

Stonewalk is a project started in 1999 to honor civilian casualties in war and is never ending.

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The 33-day, 500-mile inaugural walk of pulling a two-thousand pound granite memorial stone engraved with the words UNKNOWN CIVILIANS KILLED IN WAR to Washington, DC was in the hope of seeing it placed permanently in Arlington National Cemetery.  The dream lives on.

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COVENTRY, ENGLAND

Stonewalk, (US, Ireland, England, Japan, Korea)

 The Coventry blitz from the German word Blitzkrieg meaning “lightning war” was a series of bombing raids that took place on the English city of Coventry.
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The city was bombed many times during the Second World War by the German Air Force (Luftwaffe). The most devastating of these attacks occurred on the evening of 14 November 1940.
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Stone at St. Michael’s Cathedral in Coventry, England.

Memorial Stone for Unknown Civilians Killed in War placed at St. Michael’s Cathedral in Coventry, England in 2001.  Pulled by Stonewalkers from Liverpool to Coventry where it was placed in perpetuity during a special ceremony at St. Michael’s Cathedral which was bombed during the WW II.

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HIROSHIMA, JAPAN

Following the dropping of the Atomic Bomb on the city.

Stone at the Cathedral in Hiroshima.

Memorial Stone pulled from Nagasaki to Hiroshima, Japan by Stonewalkers and placed in perpetuity at the Hiroshima World Peace Memorial Cathedral on August 6, 2005, the 60th anniversary of the atomic bombing.

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DMZ KOREA

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The Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) is a region on the Korean peninsula that demarcates North Korea from South Korea. Roughly following the 38th parallel, the 150-mile-long DMZ incorporates territory on both sides of the cease-fire line as it existed at the end of the Korean War (1950–53).

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Stone at the DMZ.

Memorial Stone for Unknown Civilians Killed in War created and pulled by Japanese Stonewalkers from the Southern coast of South Korea to the DMZ in 2007.  The Stone is placed in perpetuity at the Korean demilitarized zone.

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EL SALVADOR, CENTRAL AMERICA

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Archbishop Oscar Romero is the Patron Saint of the Peace Abbey and inspires our nonviolent efforts to address social injustice.
Romero was assassinated on March 24, 1980 while saying Mass at the Cancer Hospital Chapel at the Hospital of the Divine Providence where he lived in San Salvador.  Archbishop Oscar Romero was assassinated on March 24, 1980.
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Abbey created bronze busts of Oscar Romero are at Peace Centers and Chapels throughout Central America.

Bronze bust of Oscar Romero at the Romero Museum.

Bust of Oscar Romero presented to the Romero Museum in San Salvador and is placed at the front entrance.
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Cottage where Romero lived with Romero bust at the front entrance.

Romero Bust in front of the Cottage where he lived on the grounds of the Hospital of the Divine Providence, San Salvador.
Presentation of Romero molds at the Romero Museum in San Salvador.

Presentation of Romero molds at the Romero Museum in San Salvador.

University of Iowa faculty participating in presentation of molds at the Romero Museum in San Salvador.

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Molds designed by Lewis Randa and artist Lado Goudjabidze.

The Romero Project was started to help generate funds for humanitarian efforts in El Salvador through the creation and circulation of 12” rubber medallion molds of Monsignor Oscar Romero.   These molds, sculpted by Lado Goudjabidze, are given free of charge to schools, hospitals, churches and community centers in villages in El Salvador.  Provided with instructions on how to mix and pour inexpensive plaster into the molds to create a beautiful wall hanging, the Romero Project seeks to place in the hands of those who loved the late Archbishop the means to generate additional income for their families, groups or organizations.

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MOSCOW, RUSSIA

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In December 1982 Samantha Smith, a 10-year-old girl from Manchester, Me., wrote to Soviet leader Yuri Andropov to ask if he was going to wage a nuclear war against the U.S.
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Samantha Smith bust commissioned following her tragic death with her father Arthur on a small plane returning to Maine.

 This simple effort of writing a letter by a young American brought about a shift in US – Soviet relations and nurtured expressions of peace throughout the world.  The bust of  Samantha Smith was presented to the Moscow Samantha Smith Peace Foundation at a special ceremony at the Life Experience School in 1988.  The Samantha Smith Project continues to share her story with the world.

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PLACEMENT OF PEACE ABBEY PUBLIC ART

(Commissioned Works of Art by Lewis Randa through the artistry of Lado & Shake Goudjabidze.)  

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Mohandas K. Gandhi Statue

The Pacifist Memorial, Sherborn, MA

Healey Library, University of Massachusetts Boston, MA

(Proposed location at Dewey Square, Boston, MA)

Mohandas K. Gandhi Bust

 United Nations Headquarters, NYC

Healey Library, University of Massachusetts

Emily the Cow Statue

Sacred Cow Animal Rights Memorial, Sherborn, MA

Mother Teresa  Statue 

Blessed Mother Teresa Church, Dorchester, MA

Women’s Correctional Facility, Framingham, MA

Mother Antonia, Tijuana Correctional Facility, Mexico

Archdiocese of Des Moines, IA St.

Anthony’s Church, Des Moines, IA  

Mercy Hospital, Des Moines, IA

Healey Library, University of Massachusetts Boston, MA

St. Mary’s Church Dedham, MA

Monsignor Oscar Romero Bust

The Metropolitan Cathedral of the Holy Savior, El Salvador, CA

Monsignor Romero and Martyrs Center, El Salvador, CA

Hospital of the Divine Providence, (Romero Cottage) El Salvador, CA

The National Oscar Romero Museum, El Salvador, CA

Healey Library, University of Massachusetts Boston

John F. Kennedy Bust 

JFK Presidential Library and Museum, Boston

Healey Library, University of Massachusetts Boston 

Robert F. Kennedy Bust

JFK Presidential Library and Museum, Boston

Healey Library, University of Massachusetts Boston

Samantha Smith Bust

Samantha Smith Peace Center, Moscow, Russia

Pine Hill Elementary School, Sherborn, MA

Healey Library, University of Massachusetts Boston

Courage of Conscience Award   

Healey Library, University of Massachusetts Boston

158 Recipients throughout the World

Barack Obama and Grandmother Bust

Healey Library, University of Massachusetts Boston

Conscientious Objector Memorial Stone 

Cambridge Friends Meeting, (Quakers) Cambridge, MA

Victim of Violence Memorial Stone 

Pacifist Memorial, Sherborn, MA

Memorial Stone for Conscientious Objectors on CO Hill 

Pacifist Memorial, Sherborn, MA

Unknown Civilians Killed in War

Pacifist Memorial, Sherborn, MA

St. Michael’s Cathedral, Coventry, England

Hiroshima, Japan

DMZ Korea (Gift from Hibakusha)

Multi-faith Altar

University of Massachusetts Boston Chapel

GIFTS OR UNDER STEWARDSHIP OF NON-COMMISSIONED ART

Chapel hand-carved wooden crucifix

Walcott Avenue, Des Moines, IA

Madonna and Child

Holy Family Church, Duxbury, MA

Giant Red Wood Tree

Fiske Memorial Library, Wrentham

PEACE ABBEY LIBRARY

University of Massachusetts Boston   (Political, Social Justice, Pacifism, Conscientious Objection, Animal Rights)

Boston University School of Theology, Harvard Divinity School, Bethany Prison Ministries  (Multi-faith, religious, spirituality)

The above listed gifts were made by The Life Experience School and The Peace Abbey.

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Above photograph is the IMAGINE tribute to John Lennon in Central Park which is a place of pilgrimage for a generation of peacemakers who were influenced by his life, music and commitment to peace and social justice.

Peace Abbey holdings at UMASS Boston

To make an appointment to visit the Peace Abbey Collection, contact UMB Archives at: 617.287.5469  library.archives@umb.edu

Peace and Justice display at Healey Library.

Peace and Justice display at Healey Library.

The Peace Abbey permanent exhibit is under construction so call before visiting.

The pendulum of the Grandfather clock that recipients of the Courage of Conscience Award wound continues to swing in the new Peace Room at the Healey Library, University of Massachusetts Boston.

Students and faculty sit at the Peacemakers Table for classes and to study throughout the day.

The replica of the bronze statue of Mahatma Gandhi stands as a symbol of nonviolence and peacemaking in the new Peace Room.

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UMB PEACE GIFT SIGNING CEREMONY  JULY 9, 2012

What do you get when you incorporate the Peace Abbey history and holdings into the University of Massachusetts Boston? You get an expression of its long journey for Peace, Social Action, Public Policy and the Arts!   So what exactly are we gifting the Healey Library at UMB?

For over a quarter of a century, The Peace Abbey has been a major center for the promotion of peace and social justice for metropolitan Boston and entire New England area and is recognized internationally for its work. Like its parent organization the Life Experience School, it was inspired by the life and times of Bobby Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr, so it is most fitting that it now finds its new home next to the Kennedy Presidential Library and the soon to be completed Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate. It was Ted Kennedy’s congressional inquiry into my case as a conscientious objector while a member of the 114th Medical battalion of the Massachusetts Army National Guard in 1971 that led to my discharge. And the Life Experience School and later the Peace Abbey would become, not simply alternative service, but “a lifelong alternative service”.   So these gifts that we bestow on the University of Massachusetts Boston today are much more than they appear for they are the outward and physical representation of a journey of empowering people to say no to violence and to war and all that is deemed unacceptable by conscience.

Thus, the Peace Abbey served as the Founding headquarters for the National Registry for Conscientious Objection, stored archival material from the Vietnam War to the present wars in the Middle East, sought to demonstrate opposition to militarism through numerous, high profile peaceful acts of civil disobedience to prevent, then end armed conflict; endeavored to influence public policy through the recognition of unknown civilian casualties of war at Arlington National Cemetery through STONEWALK, USA which became a global requiem pilgrimage through the Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland, England, Japan and South Korea which ended at the DMZ. The Abbey and the Life Experience School helped draw attention to the need to change the name of the state department here in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts that provides services to developmentally disabled individuals. We helped get the R word removed from the agency name, once and for all. The Peace Abbey commissioned great works of peace art through a collaboration with Georgian Artists, Lado and Shake Goudjabidze which included acclaimed sculptures of Mahatma Gandhi, Mother Teresa, Oscar Romero of El Salvador, Samantha Smith, President Kennedy, Robert Kennedy, Emily the Cow and the peace dove in out reached hands which is the Courage of Conscience Award which has been presented to extraordinary practitioners of nonviolent social change throughout the world. In the course of these twenty-five years, the Peace Abbey sought to reduce misunderstanding and its consequential violence by bringing religions, one of the major causes of war, hatred and societal dysfunction, together under one roof in the Abbey Chapel of Change.

So today, July 9, 2012, we are formally gifting to the University of Massachusetts Boston, the Peacemakers Table, around which Mother Teresa, Muhammad Ali, Maya Angelou and many other peacemakers sat, the Abbey Grandfather Clock, which was donated by my father in honor of my mother Helen Randa, its display cases with artifacts of this extraordinary journey of peacemaking that the Life Experience School began in 1972, and gifting replicas of the original bronze statues belonging to the Life Experience School and the Peace Abbey along with the entire peace, social justice, pacifism and animal rights library. May the new Center and Archives for Peace, Social Action, Public Policy and the Arts put them to good use in educating students, faculty and the general public in the ways of peacemaking and the power and moral authority of nonviolence.

Today we sign the Deed of Gift to the University of Massachusetts Boston as a form of friendship, with every hope for the future and a desire that the Life Experience School and Peace Abbey’s mission, which is to make the world more compassionate and understanding, less harsh & more loving, finds expression here in this newly created Center & Archives for Peace, Social Justice, Public Policy & the Arts.

Lewis M. Randa, Founder
The Life Experience School / Peace Abbey

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Never Joined, Never Ratified or Withdrew

This is a list of 15 significant international organizaitons and treaties “boycotted” — for one reason or another — by the US Government. The list is incomplete. Readers are encouraged to add any additional organization or treaty by sending email to geovisual at comcast.net. (The US State Department maintains an on-line list of 37 “Treaties Pending in the Senate,” some of which are included below and most of which are not included below. Of course, it’s a matter of personal opinion what treaties are “significant” and what are not.)

1919-1946 –  League of Nations. “In the Treaty of Versailles, it was Woodrow Wilson, the president of America, that suggested that the League of Nations as part of his fourteen points… [It was] difficult…for the League to function without having the United States as a member. But it was a Republican majority in Congress that blocked the USA’s entry into the League, not the President. It is now known that Wilson was very, very ill during vital periods at Versailles and afterwards and probably lacked the will to win Congress around.”

June 26, 1945 – United Nations (UN). Charter signed in San Francisco. “Beginning in last decades of the Cold War, American & European critics of the UN condemned the organization for perceived mismanagement and corruption…” “Since 1985 the U.S. Congress has refused to authorize payment of the U.S. dues, in order to force UN compliance with U.S. wishes, as well as a reduction in the U.S. assessment. After prolonged negotiations, the U.S. and the UN negotiated an agreement whereby the United States would pay a large part of the money it owes, and in exchange the UN would reduce the assessment rate ceiling from 25% to 22%. The reduction in the assessment rate ceiling was among the reforms contained in the 1999 Helms-Biden legislation, which links payment of $926 million in U.S. arrears to the UN and other international organizations to a series of reform benchmarks. U.S. arrears to the UN currently total over $1.3 billion. Of this, $612 million is payable under Helms-Biden. The remaining $700 million result from various legislative and policy withholdings; at present, there are no plans to pay these amounts.”

November 4, 1946 – UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). “In 1984, the United States withheld its contributions & withdrew from the organization in protest [of the “New World Information and Communication Order”], followed by the United Kingdom in 1985. Singapore withdraw also at the end of 1985, citing rising membership fees. Following a change of government in 1997, the UK rejoined. The United States rejoined in 2003, followed by Singapore on 8 October 2007.” /// From New York Times: “The United States lost its vote at Unesco on [November 8, 2013], two years after cutting off its financial contribution to the organization over the admission of Palestinians as full members. The move undermined America’s ability to exercise its influence in countries around the globe through the UN agency’s educational & aid programs, according to Western diplomats & international relations experts.” /// From Email November 15, 2013: “For the first time ever, we lost our vote in a UN organization for failing to pay our dues. And the agency we just walked away from is none other than UNESCO, whose programs are clearly and directly in the interests of Americans. Charged with promoting education, science, and culture worldwide, UNESCO works to build democracy from the roots of society, including in critical yet unstable nations like Iraq. And the reason we no longer have a voice in such a vital international organization is because of an outdated law that forced the U.S. to withdraw all funding for UNESCO – 22 percent of its operational budget – when the Palestinians were granted full membership in 2011.”

November 22, 1969 –  American Convention on Human Rights (Pact of San José). “The treaty is open to all OAS member states, although to date it has not been ratified by Canada or several of the English-speaking Caribbean nations; the United States signed it in 1977 but has not proceeded with ratification… As of 2013, 25 of the 35 OAS’s member states have ratified the Convention, while [Trinidad & Tobago and Venezuela] have denounced it subsequently, leaving 23 active parties… The bodies responsible for overseeing compliance with the Convention are the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights & the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, both of which are organs of the Organization of American States (OAS).”

December 18, 1979 – Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW). “The United States and Palau have signed, but not yet ratified the treaty. The Holy See, Iran, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan and Tonga are not signatories to CEDAW.”

November 17, 1988 –  Protocol to the American Convention on Human Rights in the area of Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights (Protocol of San Salvador). “An attempt to take the inter-American human rights system to a higher level by enshrining its protection of so-called second-generation rights in the economic, social & cultural spheres. The protocol’s provisions cover such areas as the right to work, the right to health, the right to food, and the right to education. It came into effect on 16 November 1999 and has been ratified by 14 nations.”

November 20, 1989 – UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC). “Currently, 193 countries are party to the convention, including every member of the United Nations except Somalia, South Sudan & the United States.”

June 8, 1990 –  Protocol to the American Convention on Human Rights to Abolish the Death Penalty. Adopted at Asunción, Paraguay. “While Article 4 of the American Convention had already placed severe restrictions on the states’ ability to impose the death penalty – only applicable for the most serious crimes; no reinstatement once abolished; not to be used for political offenses or common crimes; not to be used against those aged under 18 or over 70, or against pregnant women – signing this protocol formalizes a state’s solemn commitment to refrain from using capital punishment in any peacetime circumstance. To date it has been ratified by 11 nations.”

December 3, 1997 – Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on their Destruction (Land Mines Treaty). “Currently, a total of 161 nations are party to the Ottawa treaty.” See http://www.hrw.org/news/2013/03/04/time-us-embrace-ban-landmines.

December 11, 1997 – Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The Protocol was adopted by Parties to the UNFCCC in 1997 and entered into force in 2005. The United States signed but did not ratify the Protocol. Canada withdrew from it in 2011.

July 17, 1998 – International Criminal Court (ICC). The ICC was created by the Rome Statute which came into force on 1 July 2002. “Currently, 122 states are states parties to the Statute of the Court, including all of South America, nearly all of Europe, most of Oceania and roughly half the countries in Africa. A further 31 countries, including Russia, have signed but not ratified the Rome Statute. The law of treaties obliges these states to refrain from ‘acts which would defeat the object and purpose’ of the treaty until they declare they do not intend to become a party to the treaty. Three of these states—Israel, Sudan and the United States—have informed the UN Secretary General that they no longer intend to become states parties and, as such, have no legal obligations arising from their former representatives’ signature of the Statute. 41 United Nations member states have neither signed nor ratified or acceded to the Rome Statute; some of them, including China and India, are critical of the Court. On 21 January 2009, the Palestinian National Authority formally accepted the jurisdiction of the Court. On 3 April 2012, the ICC Prosecutor declared himself unable to determine that Palestine is a ‘state’ for the purposes of the Rome Statute and referred such decision to the United Nations. On 29 November 2012, the United Nations General Assembly voted in favor of recognizing Palestine as a non-member observer state.”

September 2000 – Millennium Development Goals (MDG’s). “Building upon a decade of major UN conferences & summits, world leaders came together at UN Headquarters in New York to adopt the UN Millennium Declaration, committing their nations to a new global partnership to reduce extreme poverty and setting out a series of time-bound targets – with a deadline of 2015 – that have become known as the [eight] MDG’s.” /// “The United States as well as other nations disputed the Monterrey Consensus [the outcome on 22 March 2002 of the UN International Conference on Financing for Development in Monterrey, Mexico] that urged ‘developed countries that have not done so to make concrete efforts towards the target of 0.7 per cent of gross national product (GNP) as ODA [official development assistance] to developing countries.’ Attempts to increase US political attention to the MDG’s include The Borgen Project [sic] which worked with then Senator Barack Obama on the Global Poverty Act, a bill requiring the White House to develop a strategy for achieving the goals. The bill did not pass, despite Obama’s two terms as US President. /// The US [has] consistently opposed setting specific foreign-aid targets since the UN General Assembly first endorsed the 0.7% goal in 1970.” /// “Some critics suggest that the US has ignored the Monterrey Consensus because the amount of US official development assistance (0.18% of its GDP in 2008), is still well below the 0.7% target, which it endorsed in the Consensus. It is much lower than some other developed countries, especially those in Scandinavia.”

2003 – United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO). “In 1970, the International Union of Official Travel Organizations (IUOTO) general assembly voted in favor of forming the WTO, based on statutes of the IUOTO, and after ratification by the prescribed 51 states, the WTO came into operation on November 1, 1974. Most recently, at the 15th general assembly in 2003, the WTO general council & the UN agreed to establish the WTO as a specialized agency of the UN… Fifteen state members have withdrawn from the organization for different periods in the past: Australia, Bahamas, Bahrain, Canada, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Honduras, Kuwait, Malaysia, Myanmar, Panama, Philippines, Qatar, Thailand and Puerto Rico (as an associate member). All but Canada have since rejoined… Non-members are: Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Comoros, Denmark, Dominica, Estonia, Finland, Grenada, Guyana, Iceland, Ireland, Kiribati, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, New Zealand, Palau, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Tonga, Tuvalu, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States.”

March 15, 2006 – UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC). Successor to UN Commission on Human Rights (UNCHR). “Secretaries General Kofi Annan and Ban Ki Moon, former president of the council Doru Costea, the European Union, Canada and the United States have accused the council of focusing disproportionately on the Israeli–Palestinian conflict. The United States boycotted the Council during the George W. Bush administration, but reversed its position on it during the Obama administration.”

March 30, 2007 – UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disibilities. “One of the most quickly supported human rights instruments in history, with strong support from all regional groups. 155 States signed the Convention upon its opening in 2007, and 126 States ratified the Convention within its first five years…. The US Senate failed to ratify the Convention on December 3, 2012, as ratification received just 61 of the 67 votes (2/3 of the Senate) required for ratification.”

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 Posted by at 11:00 am

Courage of Conscience Award

 

Mother Teresa of Calcutta. Catholic nun, humanitarian and spiritual teacher, recipient of The Courage of Conscience Award.

The Peace Abbey Courage of Conscience Award was created as part of the Gratitude Project of the Life Experience School for children and young adults with disabilities. All awards are bestowed with the love of the students, without whom the Award would not exist.

MISSION STATEMENT: It is out of a desire to promote the causes of peace, justice, nonviolence, and love that The Peace Abbey bestows the Courage of Conscience Award on its recipients.

Throughout history, peace awards have served to bring attention to humanitarian causes and great works that otherwise go unnoticed. The increased visibility that awards provide translates into increased public attention and awareness. And from “awareness” springs movements — the civil rights movement, the peace movement, the animal rights movement, and the movement to save the planet.

Muhammad Ali

Pat Farren presents The Courage of Conscience Award to Muhammad Ali.

Recipients of awards represent the means by which the public is able to personally relate to a given cause. They become the lens through which a cause is experienced and embraced — the persona or face with which the public can readily identify.

Awards serve to magnify and educate. They celebrate, energize and “authenticate,” not individuals, but causes in ways mere press coverage cannot. More than any other form of documentation, peace awards record humankind’s highest ideals and aspirations — serving as guideposts on the pathway to peacemaking.

Julia Butterfly Hill

Julia Butterfly Hill received the Courage of Conscience Award on October 31, 2002.

It is well to remember that awards brought attention to an obscure nun in Calcutta and her compassion for the poorest of the poor, to a black civil rights leader in America and his outrage over racist laws, to an exiled monk from Tibet and the destruction of his homeland, and to an incensed black bishop from SOWETO, and the immorality of apartheid. Through awards we become aware.

Awards are many things to many people, but at heart they constitute a testimony to the hopes, the dreams, and the actions that lie at the center of an individual’s commitment to a shared vision.

See a complete list of The Courage of Conscience Award Recipients.

 Posted by at 1:51 am